Manga Review: “Fluffy, Fluffy Cinnamoroll” Volume Two

Article first published as Manga Review: Fluffy, Fluffy Cinnamoroll Volume Two by Yumi Tsukirino on Blogcritics.

Fluffy, Fluffy Cinnamoroll Volume Two is a manga by Yumi Tsukirino, and it was released in North America by Viz Media’s VizKids imprint in 2012. The manga is rated “A,” which means that it is acceptable for all ages.


Cinnamoroll is a puppy with a tail that looks like a cinnamon roll, and he uses his long ears to fly in the sky. He is friends with several other pups who live near Café Cinnamon: Mocha, Cappuccino, Chiffon, Espresso, and Milk. This group of friends calls itself the Cinnamon Friends. A dark cloud named Cavity is trying to capture Cinnamoroll.

Now that the characters and their world have been established, Volume Two can focus more on telling the stories that happen to these characters. In this volume, Cinnamoroll discovers a secret garden, Chiffon finds something special in the woods, Milk has prophetic dreams, the Cinnamon Friends have an adventure at the amusement park, the Cinnamon Friends enter a dessert contest, Espresso celebrates his birthday, the Cinnamon Friends look for a missing key, Cavity wreaks havoc, and Cinnamoroll runs away.

In this volume, the reader is finally given a reason as to why Cavity has been trying to capture Cinnamoroll. I’m not sure that I completely buy the reason, but I think the kids in the intended audience for this manga really won’t question the explanation.

Fluffy, Fluffy Cinnamoroll continues in the same “sweet” and “saccharine” tone that was in Volume One of the series. To be honest, I have a feeling it will continue to be this way for all five volumes of the series.

The tone of the series, as well as the adventures that Cinnamoroll and his friends have, should inspire young manga readers to use their imaginations. While I may not have personally enjoyed this series much, I understand that I’m not part of the target market for Fluffy, Fluffy Cinnamoroll.

This series should hold a strong appeal for younger readers who are just starting to get into manga; however, I think that the series will appeal more to little girls than to little boys due to the “cuteness” of the series. While I may not personally enjoy Fluffy, Fluffy Cinnamoroll, this serves can still serve as a good “gateway” manga title for young readers, in much the same way as Pokemon Adventures and Chi’s Sweet Home.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Fluffy, Fluffy Cinnamoroll Volume Two that I checked out through the King County Library System.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s