Anime DVD Review: “Cowboy Bebop Remix Volume 3″

The Cowboy Bebop Remix Volume 3 DVD includes four episodes of Cowboy Bebop: “Toys in the Attic,” “Jupiter Jazz (Part I),” “Jupiter Jazz (Part II),” and “Bohemian Rhapsody.” This “remix” version of the Volume 3 DVD includes new Dolby Digital 5.1 audio mixes of the episodes and it also includes bonus features that were not included on the original release of Volume 3. The audio options on this disc are English Stereo, Japanese Stereo, English Dolby 5.1, and Japanese Dolby Digital 5.1. You can also choose to watch the disc with or without subtitles.


Three of the characters are focused on in the episodes that appear on this disc. Spike encounters a former comrade and has to deal with the memory of a woman from his past. Faye tries to run away and she encounters a “different” kind of man. Ed plays a virtual game of chess against an old chess champion named Chessmaster Hex. In addition, a strange mutation attacks the crew of the Bebop. While most of the stories on this disc may not have provided a lot in the way of character development, they were still interesting to watch and made you want to continue watching the series to see what would happen next for these characters.

As expected, music references appear in the titles of two of the episodes on this disc. “Toys in the Attic” is the name of a song by Aerosmith, and “Bohemian Rhapsody” is the name of a song by Queen.

Just like the previous two Cowboy Bebop Remix DVDs, the menus on this DVD are animated. While I do have some issues in regards to navigating these DVD menus, I believe that the overall look and feel of the menus surpasses the DVD menus on the original pressing of the Cowboy Bebop DVDs.

The major bonus feature on Cowboy Bebop Remix Volume 3 is an interview with Cartoon Network producer Sean Akins; unfortunately, the interview only lasts for about four minutes. During those four minutes, Akins talks about Cowboy Bebop’s impact on Japanese animation, how the show reached a new adult audience, and who is favorite character is.

The interview isn’t necessarily a bad bonus feature, but it’s definitely on the short side. I wish that Akins could have been asked some more questions, or that a second interview with someone else involved with Cowboy Bebop had been included. The interview that appeared on the disc didn’t satisfy me enough, and it left me wanting more.

In addition to the interview, there were two other bonus features included: trailers for three other properties that Bandai was promoting at the time Cowboy Bebop Remix Volume 3 was released and the English credits.

If you don’t already have Cowboy Bebop in your home video collection and want to add it, you can either buy the six individually released Cowboy Bebop Remix DVDs, or you can purchase the Cowboy Bebop Remix DVD Collection that takes the six individual discs and collects them into one box set.

I wrote this review after watching a copy of Cowboy Bebop Remix Volume 3 that my husband and I purchased.