Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume 13

Kamisama Kiss Volume 13 is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2013. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.

The main character of Kamisama Kiss is Nanami Momozono. She’s a high school student who ends up becoming a kami at the land god’s shrine after the land god gives her a kiss on the forehead that gives her the power of a kami. Nanami has two familiars serving her: Tomoe the fox demon and a snake incarnation named Mizuki.

In Volume 12, Himemiko, the ruler of Tatara swamp, was a central figure in the story; she is in love with Kotaro, a human boy, but he doesn’t know that she’s actually a yokai, because she is in a human form around him. When they are out traveling to Nanami’s shrine, they encounter Nishiki of Inuaki swamp, and Kotaro is injured during the encounter. The couple gets some unexpected help from Ryu-Oh. During Volume 12, Kotaro also learns the truth about Himemiko and must deal with his feelings.

Meanwhile, Nanami and the shrine are transported to Inuaki swamp. When she’s there, she learns that Himemiko is betrothed to Nishiki. Nanami has to spend around Nishiki, who acts like a rather pompous and stuck-up prince. However, as Nishiki begins spending more time around her, a change in his attitude and character begins to emerge.

At the beginning of Volume 13, Himemiko has gone to Inuaki swamp and believes that she’ll never see Kotaro again. There’s a very amusing scene when Nishiki is finally introduced to Himemiko, and he recognizes her as the girl he had encountered back in Volume 12. But as Nishiki begins to spend time around Himemiko, he begins to develop feelings for her. Himemiko agrees to marry Nishiki, but it’s obvious she still has feelings for Kotaro. This story arc reaches its conclusion in this volume, and Kotaro plays a part in it. Without providing “spoilers,” I will say that I was very satisfied with how this story arc concluded.

Another story arc begins in Volume 13, but it’s just getting started when the volume ends. In this new arc, Tomoe begins seeing visions of talking with someone and wishing to become human. At first, he’s under the impression that this is just a dream; however, after he collapses and is examined by a doctor, it appears Tomoe may be reliving a memory instead of dreaming.

The vast majority of Volume 13 focuses on the story with Himemiko and Kotaro, and I thought that it was rather well-told. During this story, there’s a section where Nanami is involved and is suddenly saying that Himemiko and Nishiki should be together, even though we had previously seen her talking with Nishiki about Himemiko’s love for Kotaro. I knew in that scene that something was off with Nanami, but I hadn’t figured out what happened until it was revealed a little later in the volume. I will also say that the arc ended the way I had expected it to, but I was still satisfied with its conclusion.

I’m very intrigued by the new story arc that’s introduced in Volume 13. The volume ends with Tomoe’s revelation that what he’s seeing is from his memory, so this ends up becoming a bit of a cliffhanger. Now I’m really wanting to read Volume 14 to see what the repercussions of this revelation will be; unfortunately, Volume 14 isn’t going to be released for another three or four months, so I’m going to have a little bit of a wait before being able to continue the story.

If you’ve read the previous 12 volumes of Kamisama Kiss and enjoyed them, then I’m sure you’ll also enjoy reading Volume 13.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume 13 that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume 12

Article first published as Manga Review: ‘Kamisama Kiss’ Volume 12 by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume 12 is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2013. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.

The main character of Kamisama Kiss is Nanami Momozono. She’s a high school student who ends up becoming a kami at the land god’s shrine after the land god gives her a kiss on the forehead that gives her the power of a kami. Nanami has two familiars serving her: Tomoe the fox demon and a snake incarnation named Mizuki.

Volume 12 focuses on the character of Himemiko, the ruler of Tatara swamp who loved a human boy that Nanami helped early on in the series. Himemiko decides that she and Kotaro, the boy she’s in love with, need to visit Nanami at the shrine.

At the shrine, Nanami kicks Tomoe and Mizuki out after she gets in an argument with Tomoe. While they’re gone, the shrine is transported to Inunaki swamp. Aoi, the girl who transported her there, tells Nanami that Himemiko is betrothed to Nishiki, the prince of Inunaki swamp.

Meanwhile, while Himemiko in her human form, is traveling with Kotaro, have a run-in with Nishiki. Nishiki doesn’t realize the human girl is Himemiko in disguise, so he treats her and Kotaro with much disdain. They get some unexpected help from Ryu-Oh. Kotaro is hurt and goes to the hospital. This volume sees Kotaro learning the truth about Himemiko, and focuses on how he deals with this revelation. I actually felt really bad for Kotaro during this portion of the story.

Meanwhile, Nanami has several confrontations with Nishiki, who is a rather pompous and stuck-up prince. By the end of the volume, Nishiki seems to be starting to have a change to his character. Unfortunately, this story arc is not resolved at the end of Volume 12, so you have to read Volume 13 to find out how this arc continues.

I thought that this story arc with Himemiko was rather riveting, and I couldn’t stop reading Volume 12. I was so interested in the story that I ended up reading through this volume rather quickly. I also liked how Kotaro’s part of the story was written; I think his reaction to learning the truth about Himemiko was very realistic. I also appreciated how this volume gave the reader more development for Kotaro; prior to this, he just seemed like a one-dimensional character who wasn’t very important.

If you’ve read the previous 11 volumes of Kamisama Kiss and enjoyed them, then I feel very confident that you will enjoy reading Volume 12.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume 12 that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume 11

Article first published as Manga Review: ‘Kamisama Kiss’ Volume 11 by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume 11 is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2012. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.

Nanami Momozono is the main character of Kamisama Kiss. She’s a high school student who ends up becoming a kami at the land god’s shrine after the land god gives her a kiss on the forehead that gives her the power of a kami. Nanami has two familiars serving her: Tomoe the fox demon and a snake incarnation named Mizuki.

Volume 11 focuses on Nanami and the others preparing for the New Year. The beginning of the volume sees Nanami, Tomoe, and Mizuki going to see the Toshigami in order to receive new ofuda. When they go to see the Toshigami, they have to travel through different torii.

While Tomoe and Mizuki pass through very quickly, Nanami takes much longer. Tomoe and Mizuki decide to pass back through Nanami’s tori, even though going through someone else’s torii is prohibited.

When they enter, they see Nanami as a little girl. Oh my gosh, little Nanami looks so adorable! This section was, by far, my favorite part of Volume 11. Not only does the reader get to see Nanami as an adorable little girl, the reader is also rewarded with the backstory of what happened to Nanami’s mother. We also learn an interesting fact about the women in Nanami’s family that can be traced back to Nanami’s great-grandmother. This story ends with the three of them seeing the Toshigami.

The next story in the volume sees Kirihito, an infamous yokai who is also known as Akura-Oh, trying to get his body back from the Land of the Dead. Nanami only appears in one scene in this story, which sees Nanami working at cleaning up the shrine for the New Year.

The last story arc sees Nanami finishing up the cleaning, and learning from Tomoe that she accidentally threw away the former mikage’s wooden ofuda. Nanami ends up following Tomoe to the Ayakashi market that’s held at the end of the year. Nanami ends up having an adventure while she’s there, and during this adventure, Nanami shows she’s starting to have more confidence in herself as a kamisama. I really liked the clever thing that Nanami did near the end of the story when she found herself in danger.

Overall, I enjoyed reading Volume 11 of Kamisama Kiss. The weakest part was the story about Kirihito. Yes, I know that he’s wanting to get his body back, and that he had to learn where in the Land of the Dead it is, but it just kind of felt like it was throw in here during the midst of the New Year preparations for shrine. I’m sure this story will be important in a later volume of the series, so it’s not unimportant; however, I wish there had been a better way to incorporate this story in with everything else that takes place in the volume.

Even with my one complaint with Volume 11, I think fans of Kamisama Kiss will enjoy reading this volume of the series.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume 11 that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume 10

Article first published as Manga Review: ‘Kamisama Kiss’ Volume 10 by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume 10 is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2012. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.

The main character of Kamisama Kiss is Nanami Momozono. She’s a high school student who ends up becoming a kami at the land god’s shrine after the land god gives her a kiss on the forehead that gives her the power of a kami. Nanami has two familiars serving her: Tomoe the fox demon and a snake incarnation named Mizuki.

Volume 10 picks up exactly where Volume Nine left off, and the entirety of Volume 10 focuses on a story arc that provides backstory for Kurama, a tengu who has become a teen idol in the human world. Kurama, Nanami, and Tomoe have gone to the home of the tengu because they heard that Kurama’s father has fallen ill.

A tengu named Jiro is a major focus of this volume. He has been planning to overthrow Kurama’s father and become the leader of the tengu; however, after having a chance meeting with Nanami, he finds his resolve starting to waver a little bit. Kurama comes up with a plan to get into the training hall in order to see his father and find out what’s been going on.

When it comes to the storyline that’s taking place in the home of the tengu has a couple of unexpected twists, which I thought worked rather nicely for the story being told. And since this particular storyline is resolved at the end of this volume, I can say that I was satisfied with how this arc was concluded. When I finished the volume, I realized that while the story may have been taking place in the home of the tengu, Kurama didn’t get focused on as much in this story arc as he did in Volume Nine; in fact, Nanami was the character who seemed to receive the most focus in Volume 10.

This volume also has a bit of a focus on Tomoe and his feelings toward Nanami, and I think that fans of the Tomoe and Nanami pairing will appreciate seeing this getting focused on in this volume. Nanami also acquires an admirer in the world of the tengu, who can be added to the ever growing list of admirers that Nanmi has acquired. Fortunately, it appears the tengu admirer won’t be a long-term issue for Nanami to deal with.

Volume 10 was a strong continuation of the story arc in the home of the tengu that was introduced in Volume Nine. If you’ve enjoyed Kamisama Kiss up to this point, then I don’t think you’ll be disappointed in Volume 10.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume 10 that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume Nine

Article first published as Manga Review: ‘Kamisama Kiss’ Volume Nine by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume Nine is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2012. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.

Nanami Momozono is the main character of Kamisama Kiss, and she’s a high school student who becomes homeless after her father skips out of town in order to avoid paying his gambling debts. While in the park one night, Nanami has a chance encounter with a man who turns out to be the land god; he gives Nanami a kiss on the forehead that gives her the power of a kami. Nanami becomes the new god at the land god’s shrine. At this point in the story, Nanami has two familiars serving her: Tomoe the fox demon and a snake incarnation named Mizuki.

Volume Nine begins with Nanami’s return home to the shrine after her time at the kami conference. She visits Kayako, the human kami in Kyoto who is in love with Kirihito. Through this time she spends with Kayako, Nanami comes to realize that she shouldn’t give up on her feelings for Tomoe.

However, the bulk of the volume focuses on a story arc that provides quite a bit of backstory for Kurama, the tengu who has become a teen idol in the human world. Readers of Kamisama Kiss who like the character of Kurama will get a payoff with this volume, due to all of the backstory and focus placed on him in this volume. Unfortunately, this story arc doesn’t conclude in Volume Nine, so you have to read Volume 10 in order to find out how Kurama’s story arc continues.

During this arc, we meet a young tengu named Botanmaru who is looking for Kurama. It turns out there’s trouble in the home of the tengu, due to Kurama’s father falling ill. Botanmaru hopes that by bringing Kurama back, that perhaps the situation can be improved. Nanami insists that Kurama should go, and that she and Tomoe will accompany him. This volume sees Kurama’s return, which allows the reader to meet some of the other tengu.

By far, my favorite portion of this volume is the story arc with Kurama’s backstory. While I don’t consider myself a fan of the character of Kurama, I enjoyed getting to see his backstory. As a reader, I’m starting to have a much better understanding of his character and why Kurama acts the way he is. In fact, by the time I finished reading Volume Nine, I started feeling a little sorry for Kurama.

To me, Volume Nine was a good continuation to the story of Kamisama Kiss. If you’ve read the previous eight volumes of the series and enjoyed them, then I think you will also enjoy Volume Nine.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume Nine that my older daughter checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume Eight

Article first published as Manga Review: Kamisama Kiss Volume Eight by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume Eight is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2012. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.


Nanami Momozono is a high school student who becomes homeless after her father skips out of town in order to avoid paying his gambling debts. One night, Nanami meets a man who turns out to be the land god; he gives her a kiss on the forehead and gives her the power of a kami. With this kiss, Nanami becomes the new god at the land god’s shrine. Nanami has two familiars serving her: Tomoe the fox demon and a snake incarnation named Mizuki.

This volume finds Nanami in the land of the dead after falling down a hole at the end of Volume Seven after being assigned to protect the entrance during the kami conference. A human named Kirihito fell into the land of the dead with her. While she’s in the land of the dead, Nanami learns that Kirihito isn’t what he seems to be, and also manages to raise the ire of Yomotsuokami, the kami of the land of the dead.

Tomoe also gets to play a major role later in Volume Eight, and a character the reader hasn’t seen for quite a while also makes a return. At the same time this character returns, the reader also learns a little something about Tomoe as well.

I apologize for the vagueness of some of this plot synopsis, but if I go any farther, I run the risk of going into “spoiler” territory even more than I already have. I don’t want to give too much away, because then no one would have a reason to read Volume Eight after reading this review.

I ended up really enjoying Volume Eight. In fact, I got so wrapped up in what I was reading that I didn’t want to put it down. I think that this was due not only to the actual story itself, but it was also due to Suzuki’s art style. Her art style complements this story very well, which makes the manga just as enjoyable to look at as it is to read it.

If you’ve the previous seven volumes of Kamisama Kiss, then I think you’ll find that Volume Eight is also an enjoyable and satisfying read.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume Eight that my older daughter checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume Seven

Article first published as Manga Review: Kamisama Kiss Volume Seven by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume Seven is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2012. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.


Nanami Momozono is a high school student who becomes homeless after her father leaves in order to avoid paying his gambling debts. One night in the park, Nanami meets a man who turns out to be the land god; he kisses her on the forehead and gives her the power of a kami. With this kiss, Nanami becomes the new god at the land god’s shrine. At this point in the series, Nanami has two familiars serving her: the fox demon Tomoe and a snake incarnation named Mizuki.

This volume has a strong focus on Nanami and Mizuki. Mizuki tries going out among humans on his own, but finds out that he’s not ready. Nanami, meanwhile, tries to take Tomoe out on a “date” at an amusement park. The “date” doesn’t go anywhere near what Nanami had expected.

After these stories, the focus of the volume is on the kami conference that Nanami was chosen to attend at the end of Volume Six. When there’s only enough money for one of Nanami’s familiars to accompany her, it has to be decided whether Tomoe or Mizuki will be going. Once Nanami gets to the conference, she is treated with disdain by some of the other kami. To add to this, she is assigned to go to the entrance to the land of the dead to protect it from being destroyed.

I have to admit that when I first started reading this volume, I was a little disappointed that it didn’t launch immediately into the storyline about the kami conference. However, the first two stories that appear in here are important character development pieces, and the first story also explains why there isn’t enough money for both of Nanami’s familiars to accompany her to the conference. This volume also ends with a bit of a cliffhanger, so now I want to read Volume Eight to see what happens to Nanami at the entrance to the land of the dead.

Overall, I found Kamisama Kiss Volume Seven to be a good read. For Kamisama Kiss fans who enjoy the Nanami and Tomoe pairing, there’s development for this pairing that should satisfy them. Even if you’re not a fan of the particular pairing, there’s still plenty to enjoy when reading Volume Seven.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume Seven that my older daughter checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume Six

Article first published as Manga Review: Kamisama Kiss Volume Six by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume Six is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2011. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.


A high school student named Nanami Momozono becomes homeless after her father suddenly leaves to get out of his paying his gambling debts. After being kicked out of her home, Nanami meets a man who turns out to be the land god. He kisses Nanami on the forehead and gives her the power of a kami. Nanami becomes the new god at the land god’s shrine. A fox demon named Tomoe serves as Nanami’s familiar, and the two are in a contract that Tomoe is unable to break.

At the beginning of Volume Six, we learn the identity of the new character who tested Nanami during Volume Five. His name is Otohikogami; he’s a wind kami and a friend of the previous land god. It turns out that he arrives at the shrine to deliver an invitation to Nanami for a week-long conference of kami in October. He says the higher-ups have been arguing about whether Nanami should be invited, or if another human kami might be a better choice.

At first, Nanami has no interest in going. However, after Nanami meets the other human kami candidate and is insulted by her, Nanami is determined to be chosen. Otohikogami arrives and gives both candidates shikigami eggs; they suck energy from their owners in order to grow. The kami who can raise a beautiful shikigami that is Otohikogami’s type will be the one invited to the conference.

This volume introduces another new character, which is Nanami’s shikigami. I don’t want to say anything more about the shikigami, because I don’t want to provide any spoilers. All I will say is that Tomoe doesn’t seem to like Nanami’s shikigami.

I really enjoyed reading this volume of Kamisama Kiss. The contest between Nanami and the other human kami is a very interesting storyline, and it really shows the reader just how much more Nanami still needs to do before she’s truly ready to become the new land god. This volume ends with the ending of the contest, which was a really good spot to end at. I’m anticipating that the conference of the kami will probably appear in either Volume Seven or Volume Eight. I’m really looking forward to seeing what happens to Nanami at the kami conference.

Kamisama Kiss Volume Six was a great read, and I’m sure you’ll enjoy it if you’ve read the previous five volumes of the series. Personally, I can’t wait to read Volume Seven to see what happens to Nanami and Tomoe next.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume Six that my older daughter checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume Five

Article first published as Manga Review: Kamisama Kiss Volume Five by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume Five is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2011. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.


Nanami Momozono is a high school student who loses her home after her father skips out of town in order to avoid paying his gambling debts. One day, she runs into a man who turns out to be the land god. After kissing her on the forehead and giving her the power of a kami, Nanami becomes the new god at the land god’s shrine. Her familiar is Tomoe, the fox demon, and they have a contract that he is unable to break.

At the end of the Volume Four, the character of Mizuki becomes Nanami’s second familiar. The beginning of Volume Five has a strong focus on Nanami trying to get Mizuki and Tomoe to cooperate and work together; unfortunately, Tomoe is upset that Nanami now has a second familiar, and is being rather stubborn about working with Mizuki.

Nanami’s troubles are compounded when she starts hearing people talking about the shrine. It turns out that people believe the shrine is an abandoned ruin and won’t go to visit it. Nanami decides that she wants the shrine to host a festival to prove that it’s not an abandoned or ghost shrine. Tomoe is adamantly against the idea, but Mizuki is more than willing to help.

Some hilarity ensues when Nanami tries to get help from the various yokai she has met during the series at this point. Kurama, the tengu who is the teen idol, is the most helpful since he’s been in the human world for 16 years.

This volume introduces a new character who looks like a delinquent from a motorcycle gang. He appears to be from the world of the kami, but his name is not given in this volume. He puts Nanami to the test to see if she can really fulfill the duties of the land god. I thought the test he put her through was kind of interesting, although one of the characters definitely wasn’t acting like himself; this change in behavior in this character made this section an interesting read.

Volume Five definitely shows that Nanami has truly accepted and taken on her responsibilities as a kami. The fact that she wanted to prove that the shrine wasn’t abandoned was the proof of this. I really liked how the festival was handled in this volume, and I also appreciated the fact that Volume Five ended with the festival taking place. With how much the festival was being emphasized throughout this volume, it would have been rather disappointing if we didn’t get to actually see what happened before the volume ended.

Suzuki seems to understand how to pace her stories. In the five volumes I’ve read, she seems to have the knack to not make her stories run for too long, or to have them paced so quickly that they feel rushed. Each story arc is the right length for the reader to be able to get into the story and care about what happens to the characters.

If you’ve read the previous four volumes of Kamisama Kiss and enjoyed them, then I believe you’ll also enjoy reading Volume Five.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume Five that my older daughter checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Kamisama Kiss” Volume Four

Article first published as Manga Review: Kamisama Kiss Volume Four by Julietta Suzuki on Blogcritics.

Kamisama Kiss Volume Four is a manga by Julietta Suzuki, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2011. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.


High school student Nanami Momozono loses her home after her father skips town to avoid paying his gambling debts. One day, she has a chance meeting with a man who turns out to be the land god; after bestowing a kiss on her forehead and giving her the power of a kami, Nanami becomes the new god at the land god’s temple. Tomoe is a fox demon who serves as her familiar, and they have a contract that he cannot break.

In Volume Four, Nanami finally admits to herself that she has fallen in love with Tomoe. However, when she confesses her feelings to Tomoe, she doesn’t get the response that she hoped for. After reading this section of the manga, I thought that Suzuki handled this plot point very realistically with the character she has established for Tomoe. This development adds a new layer to the already complicated relationship that Nanami and Tomoe share; by the time I finished Volume Four, I could tell that this new development is something that Suzuki will run with as the series continues.

Volume Four also sees Nanami and some friends from school hitting the beach. Mizuki, the incarnation of a white snake who was the shinshi of a water kami, makes another appearance in the series during this story arc. At first, Tomoe won’t accompany Nanami on the trip, because he can’t go into the ocean. However, after Mizuki says he’ll be going along, Tomoe joins the group.

This story arc not only explains why Tomoe can’t go into the ocean, it also allows Nanami to learn a little more about Tomoe and his past. During this story arc, a very important change happens to Mizuki that adds a major new development for Nanami and Tomoe’s relationship. I have to admit that I didn’t see this development coming, and I’m very curious to see how Suzuki will move the story forward with this development for Mizuki.

At this point, Kamisama Kiss does provide the shojo trope of male characters falling for the main female, there’s enough other elements being presented in the story that it doesn’t come across as “just another shojo manga.” Kamisama Kiss provides just the right amount of romance, drama, and humor to keep readers interested in the story and wanting to come back for more.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Kamisama Kiss Volume Four that my older daughter checked out through the King County Library System.