Manga Review: “Chi’s Sweet Home” Volume 10

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume 10 is a manga by Kanata Konami, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2013. Chi’s Sweet Home is “flipped,” which means that it reads more like an American book than a traditional Japanese manga. Another unusual aspect about this series is the fact that all of the pages are in color; typically, manga will either be all black and white, or only have a few color pages mixed in with the black and white ones. There isn’t a rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Chi’s Sweet Home to manga readers of all ages.

Chi’s Sweet Home follows the adventures of a kitten named Chi. At the beginning of the series, Chi was separated from her mother. The lost kitten was found and taken in by a family with a young son. Not only does Chi learn about the world around her, but her adoptive family goes through changes and learns lessons about taking care of a cat.

This volume sees Yohei’s father getting a new camera and taking pictures of Chi with it. One day, while he’s out for a walk and taking pictures, he comes across a lost kitten poster with a picture of Chi on it. He takes a picture of the poster and debates whether or not to tell his family about it. Before he gets the chance to talk to them, his wife finds the picture on the camera and confronts her husband about it. Neither one tells Yohei about it, but they spend the volume debating whether or not they should contact Chi’s real family or to keep her for themselves.

Meanwhile, Chi continues to wander around on her own, and she meets a couple of kittens in the park that she’s never played with before. At one point, when Blackie sees them playing together, he comments that the three of them look rather similar. Unbeknownst to Chi, she is actually playing with her siblings. In addition to this, Chi has finally become cognizant enough to realize that Yohei and his parents look nothing like her, since they don’t have a tail; she also realizes that she can’t understand what they’re saying.

Between Yohei’s father finding the lost kitten poster, Chi unknowingly meeting her siblings, and Chi finally starting have a realization that she is different from Yohei and his parents, I have a feeling that Chi’s Sweet Home may be getting closer to reaching its conclusion. As a parent, I can really feel for Yohei’s parents and their dilemma. On the one hand, they want to do the right thing and return Chi to her rightful owners; on the other hand, Chi and Yohei have bonded so much that they would feel guilty if they sent Chi away. I’m very curious to see how Konami is going to handle this particular plot element in the next volume of the series.

Just like the previous volumes of Chi’s Sweet Home, Volume 10 is a quick and enjoyable read. The series can be enjoyed by both younger readers who are just starting to read manga and by long-time manga readers who are cat lovers or who enjoy reading stories about cats.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Chi’s Sweet Home Volume 10 that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Chi’s Sweet Home” Volume Nine

Article first published as Manga Review: Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Nine by Kanata Konami on Blogcritics.

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Nine is a manga by Kanata Konami, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2012. Chi’s Sweet Home is “flipped,” which means that it reads more like an American book than a traditional Japanese manga. Another unusual aspect about this series is the fact that all of the pages are in color; typically, manga will either be all black and white, or only have a few color pages mixed in with the black and white ones. There isn’t a rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Chi’s Sweet Home to manga readers of all ages.


Chi’s Sweet Home follows the adventures of a kitten named Chi. At the beginning of the series, Chi was separated from her mother. The lost kitten was found and taken in by a family with a young son. Not only does Chi learn about the world around her, but her adoptive family goes through changes and learns lessons about taking care of a cat.

In this volume, Chi’s adoptive family becomes more protective of her in response to Chi getting outside and becoming sick while she was out. Her adoptive family tries to turn her into an indoor cat, but Chi doesn’t like this development at all. When she is able to, Chi makes a run for it so she can find her friend Cocchi and play with him. Much of this volume follows what happens to Chi after she leaves, as well as her adoptive family’s search for her. I thought this whole storyline was handled very realistically, and I was very interested in what happened to Chi as she was out looking for Cocchi.

The back of this volume also includes a section labeled, “A Cat Goes to China.” This section consists of four pages, which tell about a promotion that Kentucky Fried Chicken in China did with Chi’s Sweet Home. Not only does this feature tell about the promotion, but there are pictures included as well. I thought the cell phone straps that were part of the promotion look very adorable; it’s too bad nothing like that would ever happen for Chi’s Sweet Home in North America.

Just like the previous volumes of Chi’s Sweet Home, Volume Nine is a quick and enjoyable read. The series can be enjoyed by both younger readers who are just starting to read manga and by long-time manga readers who are cat lovers or who enjoy reading stories about cats.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Nine that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Chi’s Sweet Home” Volume Eight

Article first published as Manga Review: Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Eight by Kanata Konami on Blogcritics.

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Eight is a manga by Kanata Konami, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2012. Chi’s Sweet Home is “flipped,” which means that it reads more like an American book than a traditional Japanese manga. Another unusual aspect about this series is the fact that all of the pages are in color; typically, manga will either be all black and white, or only have a few color pages mixed in with the black and white ones. There isn’t a rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Chi’s Sweet Home to manga readers of all ages.


Chi’s Sweet Home is a manga series about a kitten named Chi. At the beginning of the series, she was separated from her mother, and was found and taken in by a family with a young son. The series follows what happens to Chi as she adjusts to her family and learns about the world around her. Also, Chi’s adoptive family goes through changes and learns valuable lessons as they raise her.

In this volume, Chi spends time Cocchi, a kitten that Chi has basically become friends with. The two kittens spend quite a bit of time together, and start learning how to cooperate with each other.

Also, when Cocchi mentions that Chi is a cat, she doesn’t believe it. She believes she’s human like her adoptive family. However, she later overhears her adoptive family using the word cat when talking about her; Chi looks puzzled when she hears this. I suspect that future volumes of Chi’s Sweet Home will be utilizing this idea more, and I expect that Chi will eventually start becoming more aware of what she really is.

The back of this volume also includes “Chi’s Sweet Home” origami. The instructions say to copy or cut out an image and to follow the instructions on how to fold it in order to make Chi’s face. For those Chi’s Sweet Home fans who enjoy origami, this could be a nice bonus for them. However, I would personally recommend copying the image instead of cutting it out, so you don’t damage the book.

Volume Eight continues the stories and storytelling that readers have come to expect from the Chi’s Sweet Home manga series. It’s a quick and enjoyable read, and can be appreciated by both younger readers who are just starting to read manga and by long-time manga readers.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Eight that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Chi’s Sweet Home” Volume Seven

Article first published as Manga Review: Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Seven by Kanata Konami on Blogcritics.

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Seven is a manga by Kanata Konami, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2011. Chi’s Sweet Home is “flipped,” which means that it reads more like an American book than a traditional Japanese manga. Another unusual aspect about this series is the fact that all of the pages are in color; typically, manga will either be all black and white, or only have a few color pages mixed in with the black and white ones. I don’t see a rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Chi’s Sweet Home for all ages.


This is a manga series about a kitten named Chi. In the first volume, she was separated from her mother, and was found and taken in by a family with a young son. The manga follows what happens to Chi as she adjusts to her family and learns about the world around her, and the changes that happen and the lessons her adoptive family learn as they care for Chi.

In this volume, Chi tries to become friends with another cat named Cocchi. Chi also has adventures when her adoptive family buys a widescreen HDTV, is tempted by a goldfish that the father of the family buys and brings home, and becomes sick for the first time after eating rotten meat that she found lying on the ground.

At the end of this volume, there was an interesting bonus piece that was included. There are a couple of pages that show what some of the covers of some of the other foreign issues look like, as well as some thoughts provided by editors of Chi’s Sweet Home in other countries. The countries focused on in this feature are Spain, South Korea, Thailand, Taiwan, and Hong Kong.

There was also another bonus piece included, but I didn’t like it quite as much. It’s billed as being a report from Chi, giving readers a guide of Paris after the series began publishing in France. Basically, someone took a Chi plus toy and photographed the toy at various locations in Paris. I personally thought this looked rather silly, and didn’t truly add anything to the reading experience.

The stories themselves, as well as the storytelling used in this volume, are what readers have come to expect from Chi’s Sweet Home. It continues to be a quick and enjoyable read, and Chi comes across more like the cute kitten readers have come to expect, instead of the more mischievous kitten that was the focus of Volume Six.

Chi’s Sweet Home is a manga series that appeals to both younger readers and to readers who like cats.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Seven that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Chi’s Sweet Home” Volume Six

Article first published as Manga Review: Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Six by Kanata Konami on Blogcritics.

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Six is a manga by Kanata Konami, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2011. Chi’s Sweet Home is “flipped,” which means that it reads more like an American book than a traditional Japanese manga. Another unusual aspect about this series is the fact that all of the pages are in color; typically, manga will either be all black and white, or only have a few color pages mixed in with the black and white ones. I don’t see a rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Chi’s Sweet Home for all ages.


This manga series is about a kitten named Chi; she had become separated from her mother, and was found and taken in by a family with a young son named Yohei. The family’s life has changed since taking in Chi, and Chi is still young enough that she’s still learning about the world.

There’s one word that best describes how Chi behaves in this volume: mischievous. It’s not that Chi is causing problems on purpose, but her innate curiosity causes her to get into one situation after another. She gets muddy pawprints all over the floor, she thinks her family is hoarding things but they’re really trying to protect Chi from danger, she gets into Yohei’s birthday present and birthday cake before Yohei can get to them, and she causes objects belonging to Yohei’s dad to roll down the stairs because Chi wants to see them move.

Also in this volume, while Chi is spending time and exploring in the nearby park, she meets another small cat. This little cat tries to act tough and really doesn’t want to spend time with Chi, but Chi manages to indirectly make this new cat play with her. Unfortunately, this cat’s name is not given in this volume.

Near the end of Volume Six, Chi manages to get out of the apartment one night after her family gives her a license tag with a bell. She runs into her friend, Blackie, and together, they go to the park. During this section, Chi is discovering things that go on outside at night that she didn’t know were going on because she was asleep.

Included at the back of this volume are a couple of pages of character details for the pets and their owners that Chi and her family meet when they first moved into the pet-friendly apartment complex back in Volume Four. While we saw some of the pets in this volume, we didn’t see as much of the owners. Hopefully, we’ll see more of these characters in future volumes of the series, so the information included in this section becomes useful for the reader.

Chi’s Sweet Home continues to be a quick, yet enjoyable read. However, I felt kind of bad for Chi in this volume, since a lot of the story focused on her getting into unintentional mischief. Because of this, Chi didn’t come across as being quite as “cute” as she had in previous volumes. Hopefully, Chi will return to being more “cute” again in later volumes of the series.

At this point, I still believe that Chi’s Sweet Home is a manga that will appeal to both younger readers and to older readers who are cat lovers.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Six that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Chi’s Sweet Home” Volume Five

Article first published as Manga Review: Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Five by Kanata Konami on Blogcritics.

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Five is a manga by Kanata Konami, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2011. Chi’s Sweet Home is “flipped,” which means that it reads more like an American book than a traditional Japanese manga. Another usual aspect about this series is the fact that all of the pages are in color; typically, manga will either be all black and white, or only have a few color pages mixed in with the black and white ones. I don’t see a rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Chi’s Sweet Home for all audiences.


Chi’s Sweet Home shares the adventures of a kitten named Chi; she was separated from her mother, and was found and taken in by a family. At the beginning of the series, the family lived in an apartment complex that did not allow the tenants to have pets; however, during Volume Four, the family moved into another apartment complex that allows the tenants to have pets.

During Volume Five, Chi finally learns how to use the cat door to let herself outside. With this newfound freedom, Chi begins to explore the neighborhood. As the volume progresses, Chi begins wandering farther and farther away from the apartment complex.

During one of her excursions, Chi is seen by a calico cat who recognizes Chi from the time before she was separated from her mother. The calico cat tries to arrange a reunion between mother and child, and Chi ends up having a rather unexpected reunion with an old friend.

While this manga series may have a simplistic art and story, this simplicity works because Chi the kitten is the focus of the story. Since Chi is still very young, her worldview is going to be much simpler than that of an older character. This simplicity also makes Chi’s Sweet Home accessible to younger readers who are just starting to wade into manga.

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Five is a quick read, but it’s an enjoyable story. As a reader, I find myself riveted to Chi and wanting to know what will happen to her next. As an older reader, one thing I liked about this particular volume is the inclusion of a map at the back of the volume; this map shows where various locations in the series are, as well as locations where major events took place. This map helps the reader to truly understand just how small Chi’s world really is.

Chi’s Sweet Home is a manga series that will appeal to both younger readers and to older readers who are cat lovers.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Five that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Manga Review: “Chi’s Sweet Home” Volume Four

Article first published as Manga Review: Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Four by Kanata Konami on Blogcritics.

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Four is a manga by Kanata Konami, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2010. Chi’s Sweet Home is “flipped,” which means that it reads more like an American book than a traditional Japanese manga. Another unusual aspect about this series is that all of the pages are in color; typically, manga will either be all black and white, or only have a few color pages mixed in with the black and white ones. I don’t see a rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Chi’s Sweet Home for all audiences.


Chi’s Sweet Home follows the adventures of a kitten named Chi; she was separated from her mother, and was found and taken in by a family. During the first three volumes, Chi’s new family lived in an apartment complex that didn’t allow the occupants to own pets, so the family had to try to keep Chi’s existence a secret from the building superintendent and the other tenants.

At the end of Volume Three, the family saw a billboard for an apartment complex that allows pets, and it was advertising vacancies. At the beginning of Volume Four, the family is packing up their belongings and getting ready to move to their new home. Chi doesn’t understand what’s going on, and becomes very confused when she is exposed to her new home for the first time.

The vast majority of Volume Four focuses on Chi and what she goes through as she starts adjusting to her new home. In a lot of respects, Chi is depicted the same way a young child would react to moving to a new home, and this portion of the story feels very realistic. Chi also meets some of the other pets that reside at the apartment complex; at this point, Chi doesn’t seem to have bonded with any of them in the same way that she bonded with Blackie earlier on. I have a feeling that future volumes of the series will show what kind of relationships and bonds Chi will end up having at the new apartment complex.

The simplicity of the art and story of Chi’s Sweet Home makes this manga very accessible to both younger and older manga readers. Younger readers will probably be able to relate to Chi and the emotions and experiences she goes through with the move and adjusting to a new home.

Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Four is a quick and easy, yet enjoyable read. This is a manga series that appeals to both younger readers who are just starting to show an interest in manga, and it also appeals to manga readers who are cat lovers.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Chi’s Sweet Home Volume Four that I checked out through the King County Library System.