FUNimation Delays DVD/BD Release For Evangelion 3.33

FUNimation has announced that the home video release for Evangelion 3.33 You Can (Not) Redo that was supposed to come out in February 2014 is being delayed due to the “overwhelming theatrical demand” for Evangelion 3.0 You Can (Not) Redo.

At this point, the release date for Evangelion 3.33 You Can (Not) Redo is “to be determined,” with the company saying it will be at some point later in 2014.

New Dub Trailer Released for Evangelion 3.0

FUNimation has released a new dub trailer for the Evangelion 3.0 You Can (Not) Redo anime film, along with ElevenArts, who is working at getting the film in theaters. While U.S. and Canadian screenings are scheduled to begin on January 10, 2014, they are wanting to expand the release to other theaters. ElevenArts is looking for suggestions on who to contact.

I am embedding the new trailer below, and I apologize in advance to any of my readers who are unable to view the video due to region blocking.

Extras on the DVD and Blu-ray Releases for Evangelion 3.33 You Can (Not) Redo

FUNimation has announced the extras that will be available on the DVD and Blu-ray releases for the Evangelion 3.33 You Can (Not) Redo anime film that will be released on February 18, 2014:

  • 52 page, full color guidebook
  • Evangelion: 3.33 at New York Comic Con 2013
  • Rebuild of Evangelion: 3.33
  • EVA-EXTRA 08
  • Japanese teasers and trailers
  • TV spots
  • U.S. trailer
  • Trailers

English Dub Trailer Streaming to Evangelion 3.33 You Can (Not) Redo

Manga Entertainment is now streaming an English-dubbed trailer for the company’s DVD and Blu-ray release of Evangelion 3.33 You Can (Not) Redo on YouTube.

I am including the stream of the trailer below. I apologize in advance to any of my readers who are unable to view the trailer due to region blocking.

Anime Soundtrack Review: Evangelion: The Day of Second Impact

Evangelion: The Day of Second Impact is a soundtrack CD for the Neon Genesis Evangelion television anime series that was released in North America by Geneon in 2004.

There are a total of 11 tracks on the CD; six of the tracks are from the television series, two of the tracks come from the Death & Rebirth film, and the remaining three come from The End of Evangelion film.

The disc opens with “Angel Attack,” which is a memorable piece of background music for listeners who are familiar with the Neon Genesis Evangelion franchise. This is the piece that plays in the background when an Angel is attacking.

Next is “A Cruel Amgel’s Thesis,” which is the opening credits song for Neon Genesis Evangelion; however, the version included on this CD is the “Director’s Edit” and not the version that appears in the opening credits. This is a very classic anime opening theme song, and it was nice to get to hear more of the song than what appears in the opening credits.

“Decisive Battle” is another classic background music piece from the Neon Genesis Evangelion television anime series. I can easily picture the EVAs taking off and going into battle when I hear this track.

“Fly Me to the Moon” is a classic jazz standard that was covered in order to be used at the ending theme song for the Neon Genesis Evangelion television anime series. Since there was a different version of the song at the end of each episode, only one version was used on this CD release. If I remember correctly, the version of “Fly Me to the Moon” was used early on in Neon Genesis Evangelion’s run.

“Thanatos” is a slower piece of background music from Neon Genesis Evangelion. If I recall correctly, this is a piece that appeared in the background during some of the more serious and emotional scenes of the series.

“Kanon D-dur (Strings Orchestra)” is one of the tracks on this CD that comes from the Death & Rebirth film. This is a famous classical piece that was used in the film.

“SOUL’S REFRAIN” is the theme song for the Death & Rebirth film. This is a decent song, but to me, isn’t one of the more memorable theme songs from the Neon Genesis Evangelion franchise.

“II Air [ORCHESTRAL SUITE No. 3 in D Major, BMW, 1068]” is another famous classical piece, and it appears in The End of Evangelion.

“THANATOS – IF I CAN’T BE YOURS –“ was used in the end credits and the credits to episode 25 in The End of Evangelion. This may share a name with a background piece that appeared in the Neon Genesis Evangelion anime series, but they really don’t sound anything alike. This track has more a jazz feel than the background track known as “Thanatos.”

“Komm, susser Tod” translates into “Come, Sweet Death” in English. This song appears in The End of the Evangelion film during the beginning of the Human Instrumentality Project. Hideaki Anno wrote the original Japanese lyrics for this song, and it was adapted into English by Mike Wyzgowski. When watching The End of Evangelion, the sound of the song just sounds wrong when you realize it’s playing while the end of the world is taking place. The lyrics work, but the sonic sound just seems a little too happy for what’s going on; the dichotomy of the visuals and the music really makes the viewer take notice of this scene. I still enjoy this song, though, even if it is the longest song on the CD.

“Jesus bleibet meine Freude” is the background music of the ending song from episode 26 of the television series, “Take care of yourself.” This track was used on the video, LD, and DVD release of the series. This is another classical piece.

There’s quite a variety of sounds and styles that appear on this disc, although the latter half of the CD seems to focus more on the classical pieces and the slower songs. Sometimes the changes can be a little jarring, but considering how varied the music was that appeared in the Neon Genesis Evangelion franchise, this really can’t be helped.

Admittedly, Evangelion: The Day of Second Impact is nowhere near a complete collection of music from the Neon Genesis Evangelion franchise, so this CD probably won’t hold much appeal to die-hard fans of the franchise. However, if you’re a more casual fan of Neon Genesis Evangelion, then this CD should provide you with most of the songs from the franchise that you would know and be interested in. It makes for a nice overview of the music from the franchise, at the very least.

However, it should be noted that Evangelion: The Day of Second Impact is now out of print. If you’d like to add this soundtrack CD to your music collection, then I would suggest checking out websites and brick and mortar stores that sell used CDs and see if you can find a good deal for this release.

I wrote this review after listening to a copy of Evangelion: The Day of Second Impact that my husband and I purchased.

Anime Film Review: Evangelion 2.22 You Can (Not) Advance

Evangelion 2.22 You Can (Not) Advance is the second of four feature films that re-tells the original Neon Genesis Evangelion anime series. FUNimation holds the North American distribution rights to the film, and released it on DVD and Blu-ray on March 29, 2011. Like the first time, the DVD pressing has the film on one disc and the bonus features on the second disc. When it comes to the video quality between the two pressings, I noticed a significant difference between the image quality on this disc and the image quality on the DVD of this film that I had viewed previously. According to the back of the box, the video is 1080p High Definition 16×9 HD Native, the audio is Dolby TrueHD: English 6.1 and Dolby TrueHD: Japanese 6.1, and subtitles are available in English.

Evangelion 2.22 You Can (Not) Advance contains some of the plot points that appeared at this point in the Neon Genesis Evangelion anime series, although some of the details have been changed. This film also introduces a new character named Mari, who starts out as the pilot of Eva Unit-05. She ends up trying to covertly come to Tokyo-3, and finds herself piloting Unit-02 near the end of the film. Mari only appears in three scenes in this film, and after watching the movie the first time, I really couldn’t figure out what her purpose is. It felt like she was added to the story as a way to make it “different” from the original anime series. When I watched the movie for the second time on Blu-ray, I realized she had a slightly bigger role in the story than I remembered, but I’m still not entirely sure what Mari actually adds to the story yet. Hopefully she will have a bigger role in the remaining two films.

Unfortunately, one of the big issues I had with this film was the fact that Asuka’s character isn’t developed nearly as much as it really needed to be, especially since she has a very important role later in the film. Since I know her already from the anime series, I can feel for her when this major event takes place; however, viewers who see this film without that knowledge may not have as much empathy for her. Another difference in this section is the fact that it’s easier to feel for Shinji at this point when he has to make a difficult decision.

One thing that I really liked about this telling of the story is a new scene where Kaji takes Shinji, Rei, Asuka, Toji, and Aida on a field trip to a location that is trying to rehabilitate the ocean and preserve what sea life is still left after the Second Impact. I thought this scene really helped to establish to the viewer exactly what happened to the world after the Second Impact and how much of an impact that event had on the ecosystem.

When it comes to Evangelion 2.22 You Can (Not) Advance, there are some things that I thought worked better in this new telling of the story; however, there were also some things that didn’t work quite as well. There were times when it felt like Hideki Anno was trying too hard to make the film different from the anime series, and made changes simply to make changes.

This release comes with a booklet, which includes an introduction, an explanation of the “Rebuild of Evangelion 2.02” bonus feature that appears on the second disc, pictures and write-ups for the characters and mecha in the film, a glossary to some of the terms used in the film, explanations of some the kinds of shots that appear in “Rebuild of Evangelion 2.02,” and full page pictures of Asuka and Mari.

For bonus features, it starts out with several trailers. The first set of trailers are for the theatrical release of the film; these include the original trailer, a Train Channel Spot (whatever that is), and four Japanese TV spots. The first two TV spots were similar to each other, except for the text at the end. The third and fourth TV spots were also similar to each other, except for the text at the end. There are also three promos for the Japanese Blu-ray and DVD release included as well. The first two are similar to each other, except for a slight difference at the end.

“Rebuild of Evangelion 2.02” is 22 minutes in length, and is the same idea as the “Rebuild of Evangelion 1.01” feature on Evangelion 1.11 You Are (Not) Alone. This is basically a montage of various sequences during different stages of production. My main problem with this particular feature was its length. While it was interesting to watch for about the first five or six minutes, I became bored with it rather quickly; I had to keep myself from falling asleep before it finished.

Next is “I Would Give You Anything” scene NOGUCHI Version. This is the last scene of the film, and visually, both my husband and I didn’t notice anything different when we watched this feature. The back of the box mentions a remixed scene, so this must be what it’s referring to, and all I can figure is that some kind of remixing must have been done to the audio.

There are also four omitted scenes included, but none of them were actually animated for the film; what you see are “work in progress” versions. For the most part, I can see why these scenes ultimately weren’t included in the final version. They were either unnecessary, or the same information and reactions were achieved better in scenes that appeared in the final film.

The bonus features also include a U.S. cast commentary for the film and trailers for properties FUNimation was promoting at the time they released this film.

Evangelion 2.22 isn’t a bad film, although there are some ways in which I feel it could have been done better. However, if you’re a Neon Genesis Evangelion fan who has been enjoying the Evangelion rebuild films, you need to add this release to your anime collection. If you have the capability to watch Blu-rays, then I would recommend purchasing the Blu-ray pressing of the film.

I wrote this review after watching a copy of Evangelion 2.22 You Can (Not) Advance that my husband I purchased on Blu-ray.

Anime Film Review: Evangelion 1.11 You Are (Not) Alone

Evangelion 1.11 You Are (Not) Alone is the first of four feature films that re-tells the original Neon Genesis Evangelion anime series. The film was originally released under the title Evangelion 1.0 You Are (Not) Alone. However, after complaints were made concerning darkness issues in the original DVD release, the film was given a re-transfer to fix those issues, and three additional minutes of new animation was added to the first 15 minutes of the film.

FUNimation holds the North American distribution rights to the film. The company released 1.01 on DVD on November 17, 2009; the 1.11 DVD and Blu-ray were released on March 9, 2010. The two-disc DVD release of Evangelion 1.11 has the film on one disc, with the bonus features are all included on the second disc. The Blu-ray pressing is one disc. When it comes to the Blu-ray, I noticed a significant difference between the image quality on this disc and the image quality on the DVD of this film that I had viewed previously on the DVD pressing. According to the back of the Blu-ray box, the video is 1080p High Definition 16×9, the audio is Dolby TrueHD: English 6.1 and Dolby TrueHD: Japanese 6.1, and subtitles are available in English. Both pressings of the film come with a 20-page booklet.

Evangelion 1.11 You Are (Not) Alone is essentially a point-for-point re-telling of the first six episodes of Neon Genesis Evangelion. It opens with Shinji Ikari arriving in Tokyo-3 in the midst of an attack by the fourth Angel. After being picked up by Misato Katsuragi, he is taken to see Gendo, his estranged father. There, Shinji learns that he has been chosen to pilot the Evangelion Unit-01. He is ultimately pressured into doing it because Rei Ayanami, the other Evangelion pilot, is too injured to fight. The film also includes the battles with the fifth and sixth Angels, and the battle with the sixth Angel is the climax of the film.

One of the major differences I saw here was the reduced importance of the characters of Toji Suzuhara and Kensuke Aida. This is due in large part to the fact that Shinji isn’t shown in school as much in the film as he was in the original anime series. Also, at the point where Shinji runs away, he never encounters Kensuke out in the wilderness in the movie. It will be interesting to see in the later films if Toji will become a more important character, or if a particular event that’s depicted in the anime series has been changed for these movies.

Overall, I have to say that from what I’ve seen so far, I think the movie version works better than the anime series. In some respects, the anime series suffers from having a bit of a sluggish pacing. The movie, however, keeps the action moving, and there seems to be more of an effort on telling a linear story than on focusing as much on symbolism and images. While there is still symbolism and imagery in the first film, it doesn’t seem to be focused on as much in the film. It will also be interesting to see if this continues in the other films or not.

The 20-page booklet that comes with both pressings of the film opens with a piece written by Hideaki Anno that explains why he decided to re-tell the story of Neon Genesis Evangelion as a series of feature films. From here, there are pieces that introduce the film and explain the “rebuild” concept. There is also an explanation of the “Rebuild of Evangelion 1.01” feature that appears on the disc as an extra. There are also pages dedicated to explaining animation production terms, the characters, and words association with Evangelion.

There are five bonus features included on both pressings of the film. The first is two versions of “Rebuild of Evangelion 1.01”; one is labeled as the Shiro Sagisu version, while the other is labeled as the Joseph Maurice-Ravel version. Both of these run for almost 16 minutes, and they seem to consist of various sequences as they changed from the storyboarding process through the final animation. Unfortunately, no explanation is truly given as to what these are, and so I wasn’t entirely sure what I was supposed to be looking for or expecting with this feature.

Also, it should be noted that the labeling for the two versions on the DVD pressing have been flipped, since the “version” is designated by what music was used for the background. Sagisu composed the music for Neon Genesis Evangelion, while Ravel was known for orchestral music. The first one is labeled as Sagisu, but the music sounds more orchestral and classical in nature. The second one is labeled as Ravel, but it sounds more like music you would hear in Evangelion. When I checked this feature on the Blu-ray pressing, they were labeled correctly.

Next is the “Angel of Doom” promotional music video. This piece uses footage for the film and is set to a song that appears during the film. “News Flashes” runs for 55 seconds, and it includes what appear to be two television trailers for Evangelion 1.0.

“Movie Previews” contains a total of three theatrical previews for the film; they all run for the same length and they all use “Beautiful World” by Hikaru Utada as the background music. There are only very subtle differences in the visuals between the three trailers. The final extra is trailers that FUNimation included on the disc for releases they were promoting at the time this film was released.

I think Evangelion 1.11 would be a great way to introduce people to the Neon Genesis Evangelion universe, and it should be in the home video collection of anyone who enjoys the Neon Genesis Evangelion franchise. If you have the capability to watch Blu-rays, then I would highly recommend getting the Blu-ray pressing of the film.

I wrote this review after watching a copy of the Evangelion 1.11 You Are (Not) Alone Blu-ray that my husband and I purchased.