Manga Review: “Pokemon Adventures Diamond and Pearl Platinum” Volume Six

Article first published as Manga Review: Pokemon Adventures Diamond and Pearl Platinum Volume Six by Hidenori Kusaka on Blogcritics.

Pokemon Adventures Diamond and Pearl Platinum Volume Six is a manga based on the Pokemon Diamond and Pokemon Pearl video games. The manga was written by Hidenori Kusaka, and the art was done by Satoshi Yamamoto. Viz Media released this manga in North America through its VizKids imprint in 2012. Pokemon Adventures Diamond and Pearl Platinum is rated “A,” which means it is suitable for readers of all ages.


In Volume Six, Dia, Pearl, and Platinum continue on their separate journeys to reach the three lakes which serve as the home for the Sinnoh region’s three Legendary Pokemon. They hope to be able to reach the lakes and figure out what’s going to happen before Team Galactic can launch their evil plan.

All three of the protagonists have their own adventures on their journey. Pearl has to outwit a Houndoom at the Fuego Ironworks while trying to save the owner. Pearl is also able to gather some information that could potentially help him figure out what Team Galactic’s plan is.

Platinum has a chance encounter with Candice, the Snowpoint City Gym Leader, when Candice rescues Platinum after she’s collapsed in the snow. After Platinum learns that she was saved by Candice, she has runs into Maylene; Maylene is headed to Snowpoint City to train with Candice. Platinum decides to go along, so she can thank Candice for saving her. When Platinum arrives at the Snowpoint Gym, she ends up in a Pokemon battle against Candice.

Dia arrives in Jubilife City, where he runs into the creator of the Poketch. Dia ends being recruited to help promote the Poketches. During the promotion, a Lickitung disrupts the event. Later in the volume, Dia finds himself at the estate that belongs to someone he knows.

The ending of Volume Six makes it clear that Team Galactic’s evil plan should be launched during Volume Seven. It will be interesting to see how this part of the storyline is paced, because the series could either end in Volume Seven, or it could stretched out to push the story into an eighth volume. Personally, I hope the story will be resolved in Volume Seven. It’s not the story in Pokemon Adventures Diamond and Pearl is bad, but it just feels like it should be wrapping up rather quickly.

When it comes to the art, Yamamoto’s strength seems to be in extreme closeups of facial reactions. It’s in these panels where he takes the time to try to include a little more detail in the characters’ looks. Another thing that really stood out to me was the character design for Rad Rickshaw, because I kept thinking his face might have been inspired by Might Guy from Naruto; I think the look of his eyes and eyebrows that make me think that. Unfortunately, I can’t tell if he shares Guy’s bowl cut, because Rad Rickshaw is always seen wearing a bicycle helmet.

I’m glad to see that Pokemon Adventures Diamond and Pearl Platinum has continued the better storytelling that has emerged in the more recent volumes. After having a slow start, it seems Kusaka found his stride a little later in the series. I’m interested in seeing how the story continues in Volume Seven.

If you enjoy the Pokemon franchise, then you might find enjoyment in Pokemon Adventures Diamond and Pearl Platinum.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Pokemon Adventures Diamond and Pearl Platinum Volume Six that I checked out through the King County Library System.